Contacts

University of Moratuwa, Katubedda, Sri Lanka.

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Tag: Blog

BlogEnvironment

Greener environment for future

Trees help clean the air we breathe, filter the water we drink and provide habitat to over 80% of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity. Forests provide jobs to over 1.6 billion people, absorb harmful carbon from the atmosphere, and are key ingredients in 25% of all medicines.

Trees play a key role in capturing rainwater and reducing the risk of natural disasters like floods and landslides. Their intricate root systems act like filters, removing pollutants and slowing down the water’s absorption into the soil. This process prevents harmful waterslide erosion and reduces the risk of over-saturation and flooding.

A single tree can be home to hundreds of species of insect, fungi, moss, mammals, and plants. Depending on the kind of food and shelter they need, different forest animals require different types of habitats. Without trees, forest creatures would have nowhere to call home.

Penned by :

Kavinda Senarathne

Club Service

Mithuru Sulanga (මිතුරු සුළ​ඟ)

“The fellowship of true friends who can hear you out, share your joys, help carry your burdens, and correctly counsel you is priceless.”

The definition of “Mithuru Sulanga” is mainly comprise with friendship, fellowship and entertainment.

Friendships can enrich your life in many ways. Good friends teach you about yourself and challenge you to be better. They encourage you to keep going when times get tough and celebrate your successes with you.

But friends do a lot more than give you a shoulder to cry on; they also have a positive impact on your health. Some research even says friendships are just as important to your well-being as eating right and exercising.

Well, how these kinds of friendships can build?

Mainly it’s from school or university or any other institute.

As most of us from university, we know that university is a great platform to build friendships. But we all were in a virtual environment for the past 2 years. The newbies of university have no idea about the physical existence about the zoom profile pictures because zoom has no ability to give feelings and emotions. That’s the main difference between physical gatherings and virtual gatherings.

Music is the language of the spirit. It opens the secret of life bringing peace, abolishing strife.

-Kahlil Gibran

Listening to your favorite music may have more health benefits than you realize. Virtual environment for a life is so stressful as we all know. Without seeing each other, without enjoying it’s too difficult to reduce the stress.

Across time and space, music has had tremendous success as a tool for stress relief. While some types of music such as classical and ambient have long been studied for their calming effects, listening to your personal favorite music of any genre also has benefits.

Thanks for all the support to combine music and friendship to feel more better in lives through Mithuru Sulanga.

Penned by :

Kavinda Senarathne

Club Service

Nagenahirata Negam (නැගෙනහිරට නෑගම්)

Cultural differences should not separate us from each other, but rather cultural diversity brings a collective strength that can benefit all of humanity.”

-Robert Alan

It’s a project with a different facet, different scope, different fun, and a different attitude.

Project ‘Neganahirata Negam’ is a brand-new joint project of Rotaract Club of Alumni of University of Moratuwa and Rotaract Club of Trincomalee that brought a novel experience to Rotaractors from both clubs through a fellowship visit to Trincomalee. The project was initiated as per an idea that came across from the Club Service team of Rotaract Alumni Mora and thereby came to life with all the collaborative planning with our fellow Rotaractors from
Rotaract Club of Trincomalee.

The first day of the visit is for Joint General Meeting and Food exchange session. This was the first physical Joint General Meeting of the year. I’m so glad to have it at this level. The most important part is their hospitality to us. Their support became a great factor in the success of the projects.

The food exchange session that was also conducted during the day added a splash of excitement for all Rotaractors. The excitement did not just stop there as we were guided by our fellow friends from Rotaract Club for Trincomalee
to visit famous places in the area; Koneshwaram Kovil, Nilawalee Beach, and Hot water springs in Kinniya.

Nagenahirata Nagam was a combination of service with fellowship and most importantly a milestone with a great bond of friendships

Penned by :

Kavinda Senarathne

BlogEnvironmentMangrove Species

Matti Kadol

This is native to Sri Lanka. There are two species of Xylocarpus. They can be seen in Western and Northwestern mangroves communities of Sri Lanka.

1. Xylocarpus granatum

This species is commonly known as spurred mangrove or Indian mangrove. The medium-sized tree is columnar or This This is a medium sized evergreen tree with dark brown petiole and bark. Leaves are alternate and pinnate, and it turns orange -brown when drying. These compound large leaves have 1-3 pairs of leaflets. Flowers bloom on long flowering branches with 4 petals. Petals are round and the edges are overlapping. The large spherical fruit is about 17-25cm in diameter. And it has a croaky leathery covering which usually splits into 4 pieces as the fruit dries. Surface roots are compressed laterally forming a spreading network of ribbon like pneumatophores with the upper edges protruding above mud.

2. Xylocarpus moluccensis

This species grows up to 30m in height and the trunk grows up to 70cm in diameter. The flowers are creamy white in color and they bloom on long flowering branches. The round fruit grows up to 11cm and it is about the size of a small orange. The fruit it dark brown, compressed and wrinkled.

Use

Xylocarpus granatum barks are used in folk medicine. They are also used to make tannins and dyes. Both species are used as firewood and in making furniture. The seed oil is used as a hair-shining treatment. The roots are used to make paint brushes.

Penned By : Rtr. Dilrukshi Wijethunga

Uncategorized

Emotional Intellignce

We all know about IQ. It helps us to take effective decisions in most of the situations. As you all know our logical thinking helps us in problem-solving. But only logical thinking is important for problem-solving?

The answer is “No”. Emotions are also needed. For example, think that you are in a situation where you need to help two people at the same time. One is a stranger and the other one is your best friend. Whom do you choose first? As we all do priority goes to your friend. That is because of your love for him or her. That is the power of emotions. So, problem-solving depends on both your logical thinking as well as emotional intelligence.

What is Emotional Intelligence?

It is the ability to identify and manage emotions. It consists of three skills. emotional awareness; the ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problem solving; and the ability to manage emotions, which includes regulating your own emotions and cheering up or calming down other people. The amygdala in the brain is responsible for emotions.

What is Amygdala?

It is an almond-shaped set of neurons located deep in the brain’s medial temporal lobe. It is responsible for the response and memory of emotions.


The EQ level of a person indicates his / her ability to understand other’s emotions, take effective decisions and keep a good social life. The EQ level can be controlled by reducing negative attitudes and gaining positive attitudes. You need to control your temper before taking any decisions. Even I cannot do that in some situations. But you need to reduce it for a better solution. Be with people who raise your positive mindset. It develops your self-motivation too.

BlogEnvironmentMangrove Species

Heen Kadol

Aegiceras Corniculatum

This species is commonly known as spurred mangrove or Indian mangrove. The medium-sized tree is columnar or This plant belongs to the Myrsinaceae family. This plant grows up to 1-3 meters in height. The stem is branched, and the bark is grey-colored, soft, and glossy. This plant can be seen in mangrove communities in Kahamodara, Rakawa, Puttalam, Kalpitiya, and Chillaw. Leaves are small, about 3-4cm wide and 4-8cm long. Mature leaves are dark green colored. Flowers can be seen in clusters, and flower petals are white. Fruit contains two light brownish seeds, and they are viviparous.

Penned By : Rtr. Tamali Karunathilake

BlogEnvironmentMangrove Species

Punkanda

The two main species of Punkanda comes under Family Rhizophoraceae.

1. Ceriops tagal

This species is commonly known as spurred mangrove or Indian mangrove. The medium-sized tree is columnar or multi-stemmed growing with large buttress roots along with radiating anchor roots. The bark is light brown with a silvery-grey to orangish-brown tone. The obovate leaves are in opposite pairs, glossy yellowish-green above growing up to 6 cm long and 3 cm wide. The flowers are 1-2 cm with a short calyx tube. The color brown changes as the flower mature. The fruits are up to 3 cm long and brown at first, they change color as they mature.

2. Ceriops decandra

This species shows a close resemblance to Ceriops Tagal. It grows up to 15m as a shrub or small tree. The flower is relatively different to Ceriops Tagal. The trunk diameter reaches up to 30 cm. The bark is pale brown. The flowers are white. The conical fruits measure up to 1.8 cm long.HabitatThe growth rate of Ceriops tagal over Ceriops decandra has limited their habitat to the mangrove ecosystem in the Rakawa lagoon area.

Uses

The durable wood of Ceriops tagal is used in construction industry. It is also used to manufacture firewood and charcoal. The bark is used to extract a dye, which is used in Batik and tanning leather.

Penned By : Rtr. Kawmini Wijekoon

BlogEnvironmentMangrove Species

Katu Ikili

This plant falls under the Acanthaceae family and the 2 most common species can be identified in Sri Lanka.

1. Acanthus Ilicifolius

This is a species that can be seen in mangrove swamps and other wet locations in Sri Lanka, and this is the only fern

This can be seen in all the mangrove ecosystems in Sri Lanka. This is a thorny shrub that grows up to 2m in height. Aerial roots are developed in the lower parts of the stem. Leaves have spiny edges. Flowers can be seen in clusters on an upright spike. They are 3-4cm in length and the flower petals are blue colored. The fruits are non-viviparous.

Acrostichum Aureum leaf has 24-30 pairs of leaflets and some of the larger fronds bear sporangia (reproductive organs) on the upper five to eight pairs of leaflets. These are brown and give the pinnae a felted appearance.

2. Acanthus Volubilis

This plant has the most similar features to Acrostichum Aureum and this is an endangered species in Sri Lanka. This This plant is limited to the mangrove ecosystem in Halawatha – Pambala area. This also grows up to 2m in height. Leaf-blades are smooth, usually without spines. The stem is purplish. Similar to Acanthus Ilicifolius, flowers can be seen in clusters. The flower petals are white.

Uses

These are used in folk medicine for different medical treatments.

Penned By : Rtr. Kawmini Wijekoon

BlogEnvironmentMangrove Species

Karan Koku (Mangrove fern)

Mangrove fern falls under the Pteridaceae family, and 2 most common species can be identified.

1. Acrostichum Aureum

This is a species that can be seen in mangrove swamps and other wet locations in Sri Lanka, and this is the only fern that belongs to the mangrove community. This plant grows up to 1.2-1.8m in height. This plant has pinnately compound leaves with small green-colored leaflets. Young leaves are brownish-green in color. Similar to other ferns, this plant also has a rhizome stem.

Acrostichum Aureum leaf has 24-30 pairs of leaflets and some of the larger fronds bear sporangia (reproductive organs) on the upper five to eight pairs of leaflets. These are brown and give the pinnae a felted appearance.

2. Acrostichum Speciosum

This plant has the most similar features to Acrostichum Aureum and this is an endangered species in Sri Lanka. This also has pinnately compound leaves which are about 1m in length. The leaves have a pointed shape.

Uses

Young leaves are consumed as curries(Karan Koku Curry) or salads. Roots and leaves are used in Ayurvedic medicine for different medical treatments.

Penned By : Rtr. Kawmini Wijekoon

BlogEnvironmentMangrove Species

Mal Kadol

Just like most of the other mangrove species, large-leafed orange mangrove or oriental mangrove comes under the family Rhizophoraceae.

1. Bruguiera gymnorhiza

Bruguiera gymnorhiza is an evergreen species common in almost every mangrove ecosystem in Sri Lanka. The tree develops knee roots at the bottom of the trunk. Leaves are elliptic and somewhat large, and the back of the leaf is much darker. Flowers are solitary and white or cream in color. Petals are about 13-15mm with the flower being 3-4cm. The turbinate fruits are green and grow up to 8-12cm. The matured spindle-shaped fruit drops to embed in the mud and grow into a new plant.

2. Bruguiera sexangula

This species can be found in the mangrove ecosystems from Puththalama to Rakawa. Knee roots or Pneumatophores develop at the bottom of the trunk. Light green leaves are elliptic to elliptic-oblong and relatively smaller than Bruguiera gymnorhiza growing 2-4cm wide and 6-8cm long.  Pale yellow to pinkish-orange flowers bloom solitary up to 3-4cm. 6-10cm long fruit is similar to Bruguiera gymnorhiza.

3. Bruguiera cylindrica

This species is an evergreen tree often grown as a bush. Pneumatophores grow as knee roots providing stability. Relatively small and greenish flowers bloom in 2-5 bunches. Leaves are about 2-6cm wide and 7-15cm long. The 4-5cm long green color fruit starts propagating while floating on the water horizontally.

Uses

Bruguiera gymnorhiza is used in Ayurveda for its medicinal properties. The trunk is used for multiple wood products. Just like any other mangrove species, Mal Kadol contributes to reducing the coastal damage. The extensive root systems provide breeding and feeding grounds for many fish and other marine species.

Penned By : Rtr. Kawmini Wijekoon